Category Archives: Writers & Performers

BWS 08.05.19: Doyali Islam

Doyali Islam. Photo by Arden Wray

Doyali Islam‘s brand-new poetry book is heft (McClelland & Stewart, 2019) – a lyrical and innovative collection that the poet describes as a “ledger of tenderness, survival, and risk.” Poems from heft have been published in Kenyon Review Online and Best Canadian Poetry, and have been rendered into film through Visible Poetry Project. Doyali is the poetry editor of Arc Poetry Magazine, and she lives in Toronto. In 2017, she was a guest on CBC Radio’s The Sunday Edition.

 

I wasn’t sure what to write for this blog, so I thought I’d provide a little fun in advance of my May 8th reading! I hope you enjoy this small game!

Poetry Quiz: heft

How to Play: Each of the six images below matches up with one of the six poem excerpts from my new book, heft (McClelland & Stewart, March 2019). Have fun guessing the matches!

ant carrying grain of rice (2)

okcupid

aries [the ram]

llama

pears

hands and dove

* “because i see / your shadow fatten, tumour-like, i say, look, / silverthorn’s tree. (one autumn we gathered / the fallen, fly-bitten pears to knock down // better fruit.) we walk, and i want to share / what i wish you had known – that love is built / not found”

 

* “my hairdresser, llisa, / untangles again & again the knot / of one question”

 

* “so, it traced / the perimeter of its plastic cage, / wondering at the hard unseeable edge, / hurrying to make sense of its enclosure.”

 

* i admit none of this would matter // if you, father, were not born stubborn ram / and i, libra”

 

* “& because / when has my dating life ever turned out, / i decide, for once, to be prudent & / selfish – to take this one thing, store it away / for winter, here in this poem, this ledger / of tender”

 

* “in four directions let the body move / a hand                                 a dove”

Doyali Islam visits Brockton Writers Series on Wednesday, May 8, 2019 at Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, starting at 6:30pm (PWYC) alongside Paul Vermeersch, Andrew Gurza, Andrea Bain, and guest speaker Yilin Wang who will  be giving us guidance on “Submitting to Literary and Genre Magazines.”

 

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BWS 08.05.19: Andrea Bain

Andrea_bain

Andrea Bain is an author, podcaster and an on air personality. Her newest project is the funny and insightful podcast Single Girl Problems named after her first book. Most recently she was one of the hosts of the national lifestyle program The Goods on CBC. This two time Canadian Screen Awards nominee has also hosted a number of lifestyle programs including Live Here Buy This (HGTV), Revamped (Slice), and Three Takes (Slice). Her career began in the newsroom at CTV and Global news and she later worked as an entertainment reporter for Reelzchannel (Los Angeles) and HLN’s Showbiz Tonight where she interviewed Hollywood heavyweights like Oprah Winfrey, Angelina Jolie, Martin Scorsese and Madonna.

 

Ahead of her May 8th appearance, Andrea shares an excerpt from her first book, Single Girl Problems as well as her responses to some commonly asked questions.

Being single sucks! Well that’s what everyone seems to think anyway. In pretty much every culture single women over the age of 28 are seen as lonely, miserable, undesirable crazy cat wranglers. Family members, friends, heck, even my dentist asks, “when are you going to get married?” And if one more person tells me about their third cousin twice removed who met the love of their life online I’m going to take out my weave and eat it.

Last week I picked up my favourite magazine and was shocked to see that they dedicated an entire issue to instructing women on how to draw, drag and hunt men down and once you’ve caught him in your trap they gave further instructions on how to make him propose. Very romantic. Not.

Meanwhile on the other side of the fence the marketing department for married life is knocking it out of the park. And let me tell you it looks awesome, married people go camping, eat dinner, ride bikes and seem to be having the time of their lives at the Sandals resort in Jamaica. The last time I saw a happy single woman in a television ad she was marvelling at how absorbent her new feminine hygiene product was.

I wrote my book “Single Girl Problems” to change the narrative about single women. Being single is not a problem that needs to be solved. Single women today are leading the charge in politics, real estate and consumerism. It’s time to bury the old notion that all single women are sad lonely spinsters. Times have changed, dating has certainly changed and this book takes a real look at how single women are perceived versus the reality of who we really are and what’s really going on in the dating world.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO WRITE SINGLE GIRL PROBLEMS?

What inspired me to write SGP was a conversation with a woman who told me that I’d be an author one day. Of course I didn’t believe her, but she planted that seed on my mind. Ten years after many relationships and even more conversations about relationships the idea just came to me.

WHAT WAS THE WRITING PROCESS LIKE AND WOULD YOU WRITE ANOTHER BOOK?

The writing process was easy but challenging, which I know is an oxymoron. Let me explain. It was easy because I felt really connected to what I was writing about. I had be doing tv segments about single lifestyle for awhile plus I had done a lot of research on the topic so I knew what I wanted to say to my readers. The challenging part was jotting down all of my thoughts, facts and anecdotes and not second guessing myself in the process. I’d never written a book before, so at times I felt a bit overwhelmed. In the end it was the most gratifying thing I’ve ever done. When I received the final manuscript from my publisher I spread the pages out all over the floor in my house looked down at my work and yelled, “I have made fire” like Tom Hanks in Castaway. I’m currently working on my second book. It’s fiction and my hope is that it’ll turn into a tv series one day.

WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR IN A GUY?

I hate this question because I can hear my 13 year old self say crap like, ‘He has to be 6 foot 4, muscular but not too muscular, really nice, straight white teeth, nice butt, come from a good family, know how to dance, smart, drive a nice car’. After dating several idiots guys who fit this criteria I’ve learned that sometimes the mate who is a great match for you may not have everything on your shallow list but may end up being a much better partner than the guy with the bleached white teeth, 6 pack and leased luxury car.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION ABOUT SINGLE WOMEN?

The biggest misconception about single women is that we’re all crazy, neurotic, lonely, unlovable, child hating psychopaths. The truth is we’re only a couple of those things – lol. All jokes aside if you really want to know what society thinks about single women just watch Bridgett Jones Diary. I hate those fucking movies.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR PODCAST

Last fall my podcast ‘Single Girl Problems’ hit the airways at EOne. The show is an hour of no holds barred conversations about dating and relationships featuring guests ranging from relationship experts to celebrities and some of the top online influencers.Since its launch in October 2018 the show has gained a very good audience and was recently nominated for Best Adult Podcast by the Canadian Podcast Awards this past January.

IF YOU COULD GIVE YOUR 15-YEAR-OLD SELF ADVICE WHAT WOULD IT BE?
If I could talk to my 15 year old self I’d say Girl, don’t cut your own bangs before picture day! No in all seriousness I’d say don’t look for your happiness or validation in a guy. You are enough! Everything you’re going through is teaching you a lesson so pay attention.

WHAT’S THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO KNOW ABOUT SINGLE LIFE?

The key to enjoying your single life is Self Love. Self love is the key to true happiness. I don’t believe it’s your future partner’s job to make you happy, that’s your responsibility.

HOW DO YOU HANDLE VALENTINE’S DAY , CHRISTMAS, NEW YEARS EVE AND ALL OTHER HOLIDAYS WHEN YOU’RE SINGLE

I treat it like any other day and keep it moving.

YOUR PERFECT YOU, DATE? THIS COULD BE TAKEN YOURSELF OUT TO DINNER?
I’ve been taking myself on dates for years. Often my dates include watching foreign films, going to the bookstore, getting a mani pedi and picking up sushi for dinner.

SAVORY OR SWEET, WHAT DO YOU PREFER?
No sugary sweet treats for me I’m a salty bitch.

 

Andrea Bain visits Brockton Writers Series on Wednesday, May 8, 2019 at Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, starting at 6:30pm (PWYC) alongside Paul Vermeersch, Andrew GurzaDoyali Islam, and guest speaker Yilin Wang who will  be giving us guidance on “Submitting to Literary and Genre Magazines.”

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BWS 08.05.19: Andrew Gurza

Andrew_Gurza

Andrew Gurza is a Disability Awareness Consultant and Cripple Content Creator whose written work has been featured in Daily XtraGay Times UKHuffington PostThe AdvocateEveryday FeminismMashableOut.com, and several anthologies. He has guested on a number of podcasts including Dan Savage’s Savage Love and Cameron Esposito’s Queery. He has spoken all over North America on sex, disability and what it means to be a Queer Cripple. He is also the host of the DisabilityAfterDark: The Podcast Shining a Bright Light on Sex and Disability available on all podcast platforms. You can follow the podcast @disaftdarkpod.  He is also the creator of the viral hashtag #DisabledPeopleAreHot. You can find out more about Andrew here and by connecting with him on Twitter and Instagram @theandrewgurza.

My name is Andrew Gurza, and I am a Disability Awareness Consultant and Cripple Content Creator.  This is a piece I wrote for my blog about the challenges of creating content and pieces of artistic expression around sexuality and disability, and how it can be tough to constantly talk about sexuality and disability, but not be actually seen as a viable sexual partner.

 

Recently, I helped create a piece of theatre around sex, disability and queerness. It was a tough process where the participants and principal actors were asked to dig into their lives around the intersection of sex, disability and queerness, and share their stories in a theatrical way. It was a harrowing and difficult month long creation process that brought up a lot of feelings for me. My arc in the show was talking about the work I do as a Disability Awareness Consultant; namely presenting to audiences about sex, disability and queerness. In one scene, I am presenting a pretend presentation to the play audience, and as I am talking, I get so frustrated during the presentation that I storm out of the play, leaving the audience to wonder what will happen next.

When we were workshopping this part, the director asked me: “Andrew, what do you feel when you go up there to present about this stuff?” Initially, when he asked me this, I turned on my professional cadence, and told him that I loved presenting to people, and that it was my calling and what I had chosen to do. It was what I wanted.  He looked at me, smiled wryly and said, “Okay.  But, how do you feel about it, Andrew?  Honestly.” I tried again to put this feeling away, and continued to protest that I loved my work, I loved what I had built for myself, and that I got to share a message with people. As I started saying it a second time, though, I stopped myself. I looked at the director square in the face, and with a glimmer of tears in my eyes, I said: “I’m tired.”

That was the first time in over 5 years of being self-employed and self-made as a disabled speaker working in sexuality and disability that I ever admitted that to anyone. As the words tumbled out of my mouth, I felt ashamed and angry. Why was I saying this? Was I saying that I didn’t want to do this anymore? The words kept coming: “I don’t want to present to able-bodied people anymore, so that they can learn about sex and disability through me. I don’t want to play up disability for these people who won’t see me as sexy anyway.” And, sometimes, that’s the truth.

Working in sexuality, disability and queerness is one of the hardest things I have ever done. While I am proud of the people I have met, the presentations that I have given, and the name I have built for myself in this niche market, there are absolutely days where I can’t do it. Days where instead of showing you Powerpoint presentations about how great sex, disability and queerness is, I want to scream out to the group and say, “Does anyone find me sexy?! Would any of you fuck me? Honestly?!” There are days where I have finished a talk, smiled at people, networked, and then I go home alone and bawl my eyes out.

It isn’t easy to turn your stories, things that actually happened to you, into slides for people to make notes about. It isn’t easy to sit there in my wheelchair, staring at all these able-bodied faces of people who probably wouldn’t give me a second look if we met at a bar or on an app. It isn’t easy advocating for real money to tell your stories, when most places want to pay you nothing for your lived experiences.

I tell you this, not because I am going to stop doing what I am doing, but I am telling you all this so that you can begin to understand that when you hire a disabled person to tell their story of rejection, of pain, of hurt; you are asking them to relive the ableism, asking them to confront their fears around it again and again. I tell you this because I want you to understand that making a name for yourself as a disabled advocate – is hard – especially for those of us who have decided to share our feelings around sex and disability. We don’t get paid enough and we certainly don’t get laid enough to do what we do.

So the next time someone with a disability presents about sex, disability, queerness, or any facet of their lived experience for you, know this: we’re tired, we’re angry, we’re horny, and it took every ounce of strength for us not to leave the room. Maybe buy us a drink and flirt with us after…that’d be nice. And maybe instead of just taking notes, take down my number.

 

Andrew Gurza visits Brockton Writers Series on Wednesday, May 8, 2019 at Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, starting at 6:30pm (PWYC) alongside Paul Vermeersch, Andrea BainDoyali Islam, and guest speaker Yilin Wang who will  be giving us guidance on “Submitting to Literary and Genre Magazines.”

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BWS 08.05.19: Paul Vermeersch

PVermeersch-9474C Social-

Photo credit: Justice Darragh

Paul Vermeersch is a poet, multimedia artist, professor, and editor. He is the author of six poetry collections, including the Trillium–award nominated The Reinvention of the Human Hand (M&S, 2010). His latest book of poetry is Self-Defence for the Brave and Happy (ECW, 2018). He is the creator of Buckrider Books, the poetry and fiction imprint of Wolsak & Wynn. His next book, Shared Universe: New & Selected Poems 1995 – 2020, will be published next year by ECW Press. He lives in Toronto.

 

The Holy Order of the Sasquatch is the world’s oldest cryptoreligion.

If you can imagine it, you can believe it!
If you think you saw something, you did!
If you think you know something, you do!

You may already be a follower of the Holy Order of the Sasquatch and not even know it. If you believe in anything that you’ve imagined, you are already practicing this religion.

The Order is a sacred Knighthood of creative warriors, a DIY spirituality that exalts the imagination and battles the forces of the Great Regression in order to make the world a better place. 

You can believe whatever you want, become your imaginary self, and maybe even save the planet! To find out more about the Holy Order of the Sasquatch, or to become a Knight yourself, please visit saintbigfoot.com.

Paul Vermeersch
Supreme Voivode

Holy Order of the Sasquatch

Baby on Flat Earth

 

Earth

 

Faith Lube

 

Guillotine upsidedown SBF

 

Never Be Wrong Again

 

No Name Pet Cosmos

 

StomachThinker

 

World_record

 

Paul Vermeersch visits Brockton Writers Series on Wednesday, May 8, 2019 at Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, starting at 6:30pm (PWYC) alongside Andrew Gurza, Andrea BainDoyali Islam, and guest speaker Yilin Wang who will  be giving us guidance on “Submitting to Literary and Genre Magazines.”

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Brockton Writers Series 08.05.19

Wednesday, May 8, 2019 – 6:30pm

Brockton Writers Series presents readings by

Paul Vermeersch
Andrew Gurza
Andrea Bain
Doyali Islam

with special guest speaker

Yilin Wang

Glad Day Bookshop

499 Church Street, Toronto

The reading is PWYC (suggested $3-$5) and features a Q&A with the writers afterward. Books and refreshments are available for sale.

ACCESSIBILITY INFO
The venue is accessible. Please refrain from wearing scents.

Many thanks to the Ontario Arts Council for their support.

OAC_REVISED_NEWCOLOURS_1805c

And to the Canada Council for the Arts for travel funding!

 

GUEST SPEAKER

“Submitting to Literary and Genre Magazines”

yilin photo

Yilin Wang is a writer, editor, and translator who lives on the unceded traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam people. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Clarkesworld, Abyss & Apex, carte blanche, Arc Poetry Magazine, Grain, Contemporary Verse 2, LooseLeaf, and other publications. She is an assistant editor for Room Magazine and a former editorial board member for Prism International. 

 

READERS

PVermeersch-9474C Social-

Paul Vermeersch is a poet, multimedia artist, professor, and editor. He is the author of six poetry collections, including the Trillium–award nominated The Reinvention of the Human Hand (M&S, 2010). His latest book of poetry is Self-Defence for the Brave and Happy (ECW, 2018). He is the creator of Buckrider Books, the poetry and fiction imprint of Wolsak & Wynn. His next book, Shared Universe: New & Selected Poems 1995 – 2020, will be published next year by ECW Press. He lives in Toronto.

 

Andrew_Gurza

Andrew Gurza is a Disability Awareness Consultant and Cripple Content Creator whose written work has been featured in Daily Xtra, Gay Times UK, Huffington Post, The Advocate, Everyday Feminism, Mashable, Out.com, and several anthologies. He has guested on a number of podcasts including Dan Savage’s Savage Love and Cameron Esposito’s Queery. He has spoken all over North America on sex, disability and what it means to be a Queer Cripple. He is also the host of the DisabilityAfterDark: The Podcast Shining a Bright Light on Sex and Disability available on all podcast platforms. You can follow the podcast @disaftdarkpod.  He is also the creator of the viral hashtag #DisabledPeopleAreHot. You can find out more about Andrew here and by connecting with him on Twitter and Instagram @theandrewgurza.

 

Andrea_bain

Andrea Bain is an author, podcaster and an on air personality. Her newest project is the funny and insightful podcast Single Girl Problems named after her first book. Most recently she was one of the hosts of the national lifestyle program The Goods on CBC. This two time Canadian Screen Awards nominee has also hosted a number of lifestyle programs including Live Here Buy This (HGTV), Revamped (Slice), and Three Takes (Slice). Her career began in the newsroom at CTV and Global news and she later worked as an entertainment reporter for Reelzchannel (Los Angeles) and HLN’s Showbiz Tonight where she interviewed Hollywood heavyweights like Oprah Winfrey, Angelina Jolie, Martin Scorsese and Madonna.

 

 

Doyali Islam. Photo by Arden Wray

Doyali Islam‘s brand-new poetry book is heft (McClelland & Stewart, 2019) – a lyrical and innovative collection that the poet describes as a “ledger of tenderness, survival, and risk.” Poems from heft have been published in Kenyon Review Online and Best Canadian Poetry, and have been rendered into film through Visible Poetry Project. Doyali is the poetry editor of Arc Poetry Magazine, and she lives in Toronto. In 2017, she was a guest on CBC Radio’s The Sunday Edition.

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BWS 13.03.19: Aparna Kaji Shah

Aparna

Aparna Kaji Shah’s debut collection, The Scent of Mogra and Other Stories, was published in September 2018. Her fiction and poetry have been published in anthologies. Aparna has written a novel called, Across Boundaries (unpublished). At present, she is working on another about the impact of dislocation on people’s lives.

 

Although Aparna Kaji Shah will be reading from her collection, The Scent of Mogra and Other Stories for her appearance at Brockton Series next week, she would like to give you a peek into what she is immersed in at present. She has titled her work-in-progress (she is unsure whether it will be a full-length novel or a novella), The Root of the Matter. The story is about the emotional impact that displacement has on people’s lives. This subject is close to Aparna’s heart not only because her grandfather, on whom this work is partially based, moved from the city of Ajmer to Bombay in the early part of the twentieth century, but because she herself moved from India to Canada in 1985; and after nine years in Toronto, she lived in London (UK), Singapore, Mumbai and then returned to Toronto. After traipsing across the globe, she has first-hand experience of what it means to feel like an outsider.

Here is an excerpt from The Root of the Matter. The protagonist, Dr. Pandit, his wife Lilavati, and their three daughters are relocating to Bombay (where they are originally from), after many years in Ajmer:

Lilavati and the Doctor woke up early. Their train was leaving late that evening. Lilavati looked anxious, and he smiled at her. As they sat with a cup of tea on the sofa, a soft cool breeze was blowing in through the open door. He said, “What a gorgeous day, but it will be scorching by lunch time.”

Lilavati looked into his eyes. She said, “You will be okay, won’t you?”

Putting his arm around her, he said, “Of course, I will. Don’t worry. We are going to begin a new life, with a lot of love from our families. How can that go wrong?”

“But you did wake up a couple of nights ago, didn’t you?”

“I did. But that’s all in the past now; a different place, a new life…. that’s what I’m waiting for. We are going back home.” Even as he was saying that, a little voice in his head whispered, this, here, is home.

It was not yet eight o’clock, and the doorbell started ringing. There was a stream of people coming in to say farewell to the Pandits, some carrying gifts of Rajasthani specialties, like sweet gajak, or spicy kachoris. Others came with a shawl for the Doctor, or books and games for the children. “For the long train journey,” they said.

The atmosphere in the Pandits’ living room was festive, with talking and laughter, but there were also tears as people left to make room for others. Many touched the Doctor’s feet. Dr. Bajaj came to whisk the Pandits away for lunch at his place. After lunch, they came home to rest a little. Kavita and Sushmita were cranky with all the excitement around them, and Indira was angry and tearful because she had had to say goodbye to her best friend, Juliet.

When they went to the station, a large group of people had gathered to see them off. Dr. Pandit’s tennis partners slapped him on the back, and his bridge group joked about his game. It was time to get on the train and say goodbye. As the train moved forward, and Lilavati settled the children, Dr. Pandit waited at the window until the last waving figure had receded.

He turned to look at his family. The two younger ones were already asleep, but Indira’s face shone with anticipation as she looked out of the window. Lilavati’s eyes were free of the anxiety that he had seen earlier, and she smiled at him. He sat down next to her and squeezed her hand. “We did it,” he said, and watched as she closed her eyes to rest.

Dr. Pandit looked, in the descending darkness, at the cotton and tobacco fields speeding by. They passed the marble quarries of Kishangarh. They had now left behind the outskirts of the city of Ajmer, and he felt hollow in the pit of his stomach. Someone had turned on a radio; it was a classical station playing an evening raga. It was only a few hours ago that his patients had come to touch his feet. And it was just moments ago that he had said good bye to his closest friends.

He swayed to the rhythm of the turning wheels and the closing notes of raga Kamod washed over him. As the miles stretched longer and longer between him and the city he loved, he felt as if he was not all there. His chest tightened with fear and he knew that a vital part of him had been severed and left behind in Ajmer; he was moving on without it.

 

Aparna Kaji Shah visits Brockton Writers Series on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, starting at 6:30pm (PWYC) alongside Daniel Perry, Jim NasonKim Moritsugu, and guest speaker Zoe Whittall who will  be “Talking TV and Prose.”

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BWS 13.03.19: Jim Nason

jim nason (1)

Jim Nason is an author, teacher, publisher, and activist. His sixth poetry collection, Rooster, Dog, Crow was recently released with Frontenac House.  He has also published a short story collection The Girl on the Escalator and his third novel, Spirit of a Hundred Thousand Dead Animals, was recently published by Signature Editions. Jim is a Finalist for the 2018 ReLit Poetry Award.

Rooster, Dog, Crow – Jim Nason: A Few Thought-provoking Questions and a Friendly interview

The book depicts a world where upside-down politics dovetails with the carnivalesque, a love triangle unfolds between a belligerent Rooster, a happy-go-lucky meth-addicted Dog, and a gender-fluid Crow. This is my sixth poetry collection and I believe I have pushed myself to the extremes of the creative mind to depict a world that is real and surreal, a place where women, men, and animals shape-shift and trade places, intermingle within each other’s feathers, coats, and skin. Sometimes these characters are the masters of decadence and desire, other times they question the very worlds they’ve invented.  The opening poem, “Rooster Wears Stilts to the Pride Parade,” depicts a self-righteous, party-pooper bird shouting: Lower your banners, swallow your whistles! To hell with this stream of green, blue and youth.

Rooster, Dog, Crow follows the Trump campaign to an apocalyptic finale. In “Flame,” Rooster, high up on stilts, claims that he learned to swallow flames/ by watching Hillary Clinton in a bright red suit deflect Trump’s abuse and lies. Rooster says, Clinton leaned into the gap/ of the next question as if the floor were/ about to part, as if she were about to be/ swallowed – red and burning and whole.

This collection asks the reader to abandon fear and commit to a life that is ecstatic with risk. The poems in this book insist that the only wrong is an unexplored life. I invite one and all to join the parade with its full range of costumed marchers, banal banners, and erogenous, music-thumping floats.

In anticipation of the Brockton Reading Series on March 13th,  I send the following questions that will allow you to begin to understand and engage with me about my new, exciting and controversial, poetry book: Rooster, Dog, Crow.

How many dogs live on the streets of Toronto?

How many Roosters reside in a single Lethbridge Co-op?

On any given morning, just before dawn, how many crows can be seen landing on the moss-covered logs that line the English Bay shoreline?

Can Roosters speak French?

Are all teenage crows gender fluid and all city dogs at risk for opioid addiction?

I will do my best to answer these and the many questions you might have when I see you at the event. In the meantime, I wholeheartedly invite you to read the following interview about the book on rob mclennan’s blogspot.

 

Jim Nason visits Brockton Writers Series on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, starting at 6:30pm (PWYC) alongside Daniel Perry, Aparna Kaji ShahKim Moritsugu, and guest speaker Zoe Whittall who will  be “Talking TV and Prose.”

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BWS 13.03.19: Kim Moritsugu

Kim_Moritsugu

Kim Moritsugu‘s seven published novels to date include a Toronto Book Award finalist, an Arthur Ellis Award finalist, and her latest, The Showrunner, a Hollywood noir story that’s been optioned for TV. Kim also writes TV recaps online, and is a longtime faculty member of the Humber School for Writers.

In anticipation of her newest novel, The Shrowrunner, being optioned for TV, Kim shares the book trailer with us along with a short Q&A.

 

theshowrunnerWhat genre of fiction is The Showrunner?

It’s darkly humorous, women-centric, Hollywood-noir suspense – and yes, I may have just invented that specific sub-genre.

What’s it about?

It’s a power struggle between an older TV producer and her younger producing partner that escalates after a third woman – with her own ambitions – is hired as an assistant at their production company. Those who know the classic 1950 film All About Eve will not be surprised to learn that it was, in part, an inspiration for this novel.

Why did you write this novel?

My principle objectives in writing have always been to amuse and entertain. Within a dramedy framework, I often explore relationships between women – as friends, family members, and work colleagues. This time around, I was interested in the tensions ­– and drama! – that arise when Olds are pitted against Youngs in a competitive creative industry. What’s the famous line from All About Eve? Oh yeah: “Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy night.”

 

Kim Moritsugu visits Brockton Writers Series on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, starting at 6:30pm (PWYC) alongside Daniel Perry, Aparna Kaji ShahJim Nason, and guest speaker Zoe Whittall who will  be “Talking TV and Prose.”

 

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BWS 13.03.19: Daniel Perry

2015.HS.DAN.PERRY.008_CONTRAST

Daniel Perry is the author of the short story collections Nobody Looks That Young Here (Guernica, 2018), and Hamburger (Thistledown, 2016). His fiction has been short-listed for the Carter V. Cooper Prize and has appeared in more than 30 publications in Canada, the U.S., the U.K. and the Czech Republic. Dan lives in Toronto, and from 2013 to 2017 was the co-host and blog co-ordinator for Brockton Writers Series. You can follow him on Twitter @danielperrysays.

 

What a pleasure it is to come back to Brockton Writers Series! A lot’s happened since the first time I read here, way back in November 2013–for one, the short story I read that night, “Comets”, found its way into my second collection, Nobody Looks That Young Here, which at the time I thought was my first book and I thought was finished, too… It was finally published last year.

Volunteering with BWS for four years changed me as a person and as a writer, and mostly because of the diverse group of talented, passionate writers and volunteers I got to know during this time. I’m looking forward to seeing some familiar faces, but also some new ones; if I don’t know you yet, then let me introduce myself by way of the interview below, from December of last year.

See you on March 13!

Ahead of his appearance, Dan shares his interview with Storylines about the inspiration behind his collection of short stories, Nobody Looks That Young HereClick here to listen.

 

Daniel Perry visits Brockton Writers Series on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, starting at 6:30pm (PWYC) alongside Kim Moritsugu, Aparna Kaji ShahJim Nason, and guest speaker Zoe Whittall who will  be “Talking TV and Prose.”

 

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Brockton Writers Series 13.03.19

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 – 6:30pm

Brockton Writers Series presents readings by

Daniel Perry
Kim Moritsugu
Jim Nason
Aparna Kaji Shah

with special guest speaker

Zoe Whittall

Glad Day Bookshop

499 Church Street, Toronto

The reading is PWYC (suggested $3-$5) and features a Q&A with the writers afterward. Books and refreshments are available for sale.

ACCESSIBILITY INFO
The venue is accessible. Please refrain from wearing scents.

This event will have ASL interpretation.

Many thanks to the Ontario Arts Council for their support.

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And to the Canada Council for the Arts for travel funding!

 

GUEST SPEAKER

“Talking TV and Prose”

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Zoe Whittall is the author of the several novels and poetry books, most recently the Giller shortlisted The Best Kind of People, soon to be a film by Sarah Polley, which was Indigo Books Best Book of the Year. Her second novel Holding Still for as Long as Possible won a LAMDA literary award and was a Stonewall Honor Book, and her first novel Bottle Rocket Hearts is currently being adapted for TV. In 2018, she won a Canadian Screen Award for best comedy writing for The Baroness Von Sketch Show, and has worked on Degrassi, Schitt’s Creek and more.

 

READERS

 

2015.HS.DAN.PERRY.008_CONTRASTDaniel Perry is the author of the short story collections Nobody Looks That Young Here (Guernica, 2018), and Hamburger (Thistledown, 2016). His fiction has been short-listed for the Carter V. Cooper Prize and has appeared in more than 30 publications in Canada, the U.S., the U.K. and the Czech Republic. Dan lives in Toronto, and from 2013 to 2017 was the co-host and blog co-ordinator for Brockton Writers Series. You can follow him on Twitter @danielperrysays.

 

 

 

Kim_MoritsuguKim Moritsugu‘s seven published novels to date include a Toronto Book Award finalist, an Arthur Ellis Award finalist, and her latest, The Showrunner, a Hollywood noir story that’s been optioned for TV. Kim also writes TV recaps online, and is a longtime faculty member of the Humber School for Writers.

 

 

 

 

jim nason (1)Jim Nason is an author, teacher, publisher, and activist. His sixth poetry collection, Rooster, Dog, Crow was recently released with Frontenac House.  He has also published a short story collection The Girl on the Escalator and his third novel, Spirit of a Hundred Thousand Dead Animals, was recently published by Signature Editions. Jim is a Finalist for the 2018 ReLit Poetry Award.

 

 

AparnaAparna Kaji Shah’s debut collection, The Scent of Mogra and Other Stories, was published in September 2018. Her fiction and poetry have been published in anthologies. Aparna has written a novel called, Across Boundaries (unpublished). At present, she is working on another about the impact of dislocation on people’s lives.

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